Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates) Flag Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

Travel Warnings

United States: Department of State International Travel Information

Latest advice,

Reconsider travel to the United Arab Emirates due to COVID-19.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.  

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a level 4 Travel Health Notice for  the United Arab Emirates due to COVID-19.  

The United Arab Emirates has resumed most transportation options (including airport operations and re-opening of borders) and business operations (including day cares and schools).  Other improved conditions have been reported within the United Arab Emirates. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in the United Arab Emirates.

Due to risks to civil aviation operating within the Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman region, including the United Arab Emirates, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued an advisory Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) and/or a Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR). For more information U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions and Notices.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to the UAE:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

 

Australia: Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade Travel Advice

Australia's Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade does not issue travel warnings for specific countries, but issues travel advice for every country. The information below is excerpted from its summary assessments of United Arab Emirates

Current as of: 19 February 2021
Last Reviewed: 4 February 2021
Latest Advice: Do not travel to the United Arab Emirates.

12 January 2021

There's a ban on overseas travel from Australia. You can’t leave Australia unless you get an exemption from the Department of Home Affairs.

All our 177 travel advisories on Smartraveller are set at 'Do not travel' due to the health risks from the COVID-19 pandemic and the significant disruptions to global travel. Some destinations were already set at Do Not Travel prior to COVID-19 due to the extreme risk to your safety.

If you’re overseas and wish to return to Australia, be prepared for delays and read our advice on trying to get home. 

When you arrive in Australia you must quarantine for 14 days at designated facilities in your port of arrival, unless you have an exemption. At this time, vaccination against COVID-19 does not change this quarantine requirement. You may be required to pay for the costs of your quarantine. View State and Territory Government COVID-19 information for information about quarantine and domestic borders.

If you're staying overseas, make plans to stay for an extended period. Follow the advice of local authorities and minimise your risk of exposure to COVID-19. Stay in touch with family and friends so they know you're safe.

Our network of embassies and consular posts around the world will provide you with up-to-date local advice and support throughout this difficult period. Be aware consular services may be limited due to local measures.

For the latest information, read and subscribe to our news and travel advice. Also see our COVID-19 information pages.

United Kingdom: Foreign and Commonwealth Office Foreign Travel Advice

The FCDO advises against all but essential travel to:

  • the whole of the United Arab Emirates based on the current assessment of COVID-19 risks.

From 30 January, visitors arriving into England who have been in or transited through the UAE in the previous 10 days will not be permitted entry. British and Irish nationals, and third country nationals with residence rights in the UK arriving in England from the UAE will be required to quarantine in a hotel. Different rules apply for arrivals into Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

From 1 January onwards people with residence rights in the UK include: holders of Indefinite Leave to Remain; holders of existing leave to enter or remain (i.e. those with biometric Residence permits) or an entry clearance/visa that grants such leave e.g. students, workers, etc (excluding visit visas); holders of EU Settlement Scheme (“EUSS”) leave; those who have rights of entry under the Withdrawal Agreements (including returning residents with a right of residence under the EEA Regulations and EEA frontier workers); family members of EEA nationals with rights under the Withdrawal Agreement.

Travel to the United Arab Emirates is subject to entry restrictions

  • Residents returning to Dubai still need to get approval before travelling. Those returning to other parts of the UAE no longer need to get approval
  • The Dubai authorities have issued visit and tourist visas since 6 July 2020. The Abu Dhabi authorities have issued visit and tourist visas since 24 December 2020
  • All tourists, visitors and residents travelling from or through the UK and arriving in Dubai or Abu Dhabi must have a negative COVID-19 Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) test which was taken no more than 72 hours before departure and present the certificate at check in. Travellers arriving in Abu Dhabi will also be required to undertake a COVID-19 PCR test on arrival. Travellers arriving in Dubai may be required to undertake a further COVID-19 PCR test on arrival and will have to isolate pending the result of the COVID-19 PCR test

  • Travellers entering Abu Dhabi are also required to wear a government-provided wristband, complete a minimum 10-day period of self-isolation or quarantine and, depending on the length of their stay, have up to two further COVID-19 PCR tests on day 6 and 12 after their arrival

  • If you’re travelling from the UAE to other countries that require a negative COVID-19 PCR test before arrival, you must have a negative test result within 96 hours of your departure from the UAE
  • You should check specific requirements with your airline before you travel
  • Travellers who test positive for COVID-19 on arrival in the UAE will be required to quarantine for at least 10 days even if they had a negative COVID-19 PCR test before travelling

See Entry requirements for more information before you plan to travel.

Preparing for your return journey to the UK

If you’re returning to the UK from overseas, you will need to:

If your return journey to the UK transits another country, you should check whether it is subject to a travel ban or any other additional requirements. If so, contact your travel provider.

Check our advice on foreign travel during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and sign up for email alerts for this travel advice.

If you’re planning travel to the United Arab Emirates, find out what you need to know about coronavirus there in the Coronavirus section.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, it is more important than ever to get travel insurance and check it provides sufficient cover. See the Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office (FCDO)’s guidance on foreign travel insurance.

For information about COVID-19 vaccines, see the Coronavirus page.

Around 1.5 million British nationals visit the UAE every year. Most visits are trouble-free.

There is a possibility of an increased threat against Western interests, including against UK citizens. You should remain vigilant and keep up to date with the latest developments, including via the media and this travel advice.

All air and sea points of entry between the UAE and Qatar reopened on 9 January 2021. See Qatar

Terrorists are likely to try to carry out attacks in the UAE. See Terrorism

If you’re planning to travel with prescribed or over the counter medicines for personal use, you’ll need to meet the UAE’s specific requirements for your medicine to be allowed into the country. See Medication

The UAE is a Muslim country. Laws and customs are very different to those in the UK. You should respect local traditions, customs, laws and religions at all times. There may be serious penalties for doing something that might not be illegal in the UK. See Local laws and customs

You can contact the emergency services by calling 999 (police), 997 (fire) or 998 (ambulance).

If you’re abroad and you need emergency help from the UK government, contact the nearest British embassy, consulate or high commission.